Dove Hires BLM Activist for Fat Propaganda Campaign

News & Politics

At the summit of Social Justice™, soap manufacturer and “beauty brand” Dove has announced the rollout of a morbidly obese BLM activist and “community organizer” (many thanks to Barack Obama for popularizing that moronic, amorphous term) as a “Dove ambassador.”

“What does a BLM activist have to do with fat liberation?” a domestic terrorist not neck-deep in the diseased liberal hivemind might ask in earnest.

Via The New York Post:

The beauty giant has partnered with a Black Lives Matter activist to promote “fat liberation,” after she was accused of wrongfully getting a white student expelled from her university over a “misheard” remark.

Zyanha Bryant, a community organizer and student activist studying at the University of Virginia, made the announcement she was a “Dove ambassador” on her Instagram page at the end of August, as she spoke about her goal of ending the stigma of being overweight.

My belief is that we should be centering the voices and the experiences of the most marginalized people and communities at all times,” Bryant, 22, said in a video.

“So when I think about what fat liberation looks like to me, I think about centering the voices of those who live in and who maneuver through spaces and institutions in a fat body.”

She captioned her video by saying, “Fat liberation is something we should all be talking about … Tell us what Fat Liberation means to you using the hashtag #SizeFreedom and tagging @dove to share your story.”

Race-hustling and #bodypositivity, as I’ve covered elsewhere, go together like peanut butter and jelly. The essential Social Justice™ argument goes that “European” beauty standards, which are actually nearly universal beauty standards, are historically racist because they were and are currently used to marginalize the large, beautiful bodies of Persons of Color™, particularly Women of Color™ (WoCs).

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Allow Sabrina Strings, the author of the seminal treatise on this subject — a work of creative fiction called “Fearing the Black Body: The Racial Origins of Fat Phobia” — to try her best to contort her revisionist history into a narrative that “fatphobia” is “rooted in racism”:

I decided I would try to trace the transition in the Western world from valuing voluptuous figures to valuing slender ones. And what I found is that it had everything to do with the growth of the slave trade. In the early years of slavery, voluptuous physiques were prized because slavery and the Renaissance were coterminous. And by a couple of centuries on, in the middle of the 18th century, it was very common for race scientists to suggest that… race is not just about skin color. It’s also about behavior and appearance. We know that Europeans are the most superior, most disciplined, most rational of all the races. And that’s why they’re at the top of our racial hierarchies. But we also think that black people are overly sensuous. They love sex. They love food. And, as a result, they are chock full of veneral diseases, and they are overweight. So, from this, we have the seedlings of our current aesthetic system.

This might be one of those “citation needed” moments. Maybe it’s in her book, but I won’t ever know because I don’t read smut as a general rule.

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